Nose of the Styx anti-ship cruise missile aboard the...
Willis Chung's Gallery
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  1. Willis Chung's Gallery
  2. 2018Mar Battleship Cove2018Mar Battleship Cove
  3. Nose of the Styx anti-ship cruise missile aboard the Hiddensee.Nose of the Styx anti-ship cruise missile aboard the Hiddensee.

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Arriving at Battleship Cove on a cold, windy day
USS Joseph P Kennedy, JR, a Gearing class destroyer.
Battleship Cove is under the Charles M. Braga, Jr Memorial Bridge.
Bow of the USS Fall River, CA-131, a Baltimore class heavy cruiser, commissioned in 1945.
A classic Huey on display under the bridge.
A landing craft from WW II, an LCM.
For some reason a Cobra helicopter gunship is also on display.  No real connection to the vessels...
Front  turret with 5 inch guns on the Joe Kennedy.
Bridge and 12.75 inch Mk 32 torpedoes on the Joe Kennedy. Mk25 fire control radar atop the bridge.
Radar domes, small units on the Joe Kennedy
Map showing the vessels on display at Battleship Cove. We will visit 2 today, and 2 tomorrow.
Soviet SS-N-2 (Styx) anti-ship cruise missile from the East German Hiddensee corvette
AN/SPS-10 C-Band surface search radar at the top of the mast on the Joe Kennedy
T-28 Trojan basic trainer, used by all services beginning in the 1950s. Ben uses his superwide lens.
T-28 trainer up close with superwide lens
T-28 trainer under the bridge.
Flag and 40mm anti-aircraft batteries on the fantail of the USS Massachusetts.
Ben on board the stern of the Joe Kennedy, photographing the rear 5 inch turret
Rear 5 inch turret of the Joe Kennedy.
Crossing over to the USS Lionfish, SS-298, a Balao-class attack sub commissioned in 1944.
Looking at the stern of the Hiddensee, former East German frigate, originally in Soviet service.
5 inch rear deck gun of the USS Lionfish
Twin Styx anti-ship cruise missile launchers on the Hiddensee.
The rear hatch of launcher 3 on the Hiddensee is opened for inspection.
The front hatch on launcher 3 on the Hiddensee is opened and the launch rail is in position.
Sets of 5 inch turrets on the starboard side of the USS Massachusetts.
We go inside the USS Lionfish via the forward torpedo room.
21 inch torpedos, 6 tubes forward, 4 tubes aft. Normal load was 24 torpedoes.
Torpedo in position for loading into the tube.
Ben getting a shot of the ladder we descended into the USS Lionfish.
Propellor on the 21 inch Mark 14 torpedo.
Watertight hatches between compartments in the USS Lionfish.
Wardroom aboard the USS Lionfish.
The Ship's Office aboard the USS Lionfish.
Control room of the USS Lionfish, with dive plane controls on far wall.
Dive plane controls in the USS Lionfish.
Another view of the control room.
Depth gauge in the control room aboard the USS Lionfish.
Dead reckoning tracer, an automated system of predicting position using course and speed.
Complicated junction box aboard the USS Lionfish.
Small galley to feed all the men aboard the USS Lionfish. We liked the big mixer.
Crew's mess aboard the USS Lionfish.
Cutaway view of one of the 4 9-cylinder diesel engines powering the USS Lionfish.
Engine room aboard the USS Lionfish.
A generator status panel in the engine room of the USS Lionfish.
Unknown switching device aboard the USS Lionfish.
Generator control panel in the maneuvering room aboard the USS Lionfish.
Hatch to the aft torpedo room.
Counterrotating propellers on the Mark 14 torpedo
Ben inspects a cutaway of the Mark 14 torpedo.
Details of the Mark 14 torpedo are visible.
Torpedo tubes in the aft torpedo room of the USS Lionfish.
Torpedo tube 8, aft torpedo room, USS Lionfish.
Always handle explosives with care!
Complicated array of connectors (pass throughs?) on the aft bulkhead in the aft torpedo room.
On the aft deck of the Hiddensse, the  quad FAM-14 Strela 2 (SA-N-5) surface-to-air missile launcher
Very complicated diagram on the side of the PK-16 chaff launcher aboard the Hiddensee
PK-16 chaff launcher, manufacturer's plate.  Presumably there is a serial number as well.
Firing end of the PK-16 chaff launcher.
Deck ventilation ports, possibly, on the Hiddensee.
FAM-14 Strela 2 anti-aircraft missile launcher. A simple support and aiming platform.
Sight for the  FAM-14 Strela 2  anti-aircraft missile launcher.
Ben on the rear superstructure of the Hiddensee, looking over the port AK-630 30 mm gatling gun.
View of the USS Massachusetts over the port Styx missile launchers on the Hiddensee.
Looking over the starboard Styx missile launchers at the  Joe Kennedy.
Inside the Hiddensee the controls have translations from Russian into English.
Programming panel for the Styx missiles.
Launch control panel for the Styx missiles aboard the Hiddensee.
With enough time, you could learn quite a bit of Russian...
Chart on plotting table aboard the Hiddensee.
Handwritten labels on the navigation control panel.
I would think you want this in the up position most of the time...
Bridge on the Hiddensee.  The helmsman's chair does not look very comfortable.
Details on the launch control panel  on the Hiddensee.
These might be circuit breakers.
View of the USS Massachusetts from the Hiddensee.
Nice gauges, but I don't know what their function is without English translations.
Fire control equipment aboard the Hiddensee.
Soviet emergency light?  Note use of standard slotted screws.
Radar and gattling gun consoles aboard the Hiddensee
Chaff launcher control panel
View of the starboard side of the weapons control room.
View of the port side of the weapons control room.
More Russian for me to puzzle over.
This looks like the communications room.
Nose of the Styx anti-ship cruise missile aboard the Hiddensee.
Detaiis of the port side of the USS Lionfish's conning tower.
The port side of the USS Lionfish's conning tower. Radio masts and periscope quite prominent.
76 mm AK-176 main gun, useful against aerial and surface targets.
The turret for the 76 mm AK-176 dual purpose main gun.
USS Massachusetts (BB-59) from the forward deck of the Hiddensee.
76 mm AK-176 main gun turret, with up to 152 rounds ready to fire in the turret
76 mm AK-176 main gun with the bridge as an interesting background.
Forward hatches on the Hiddensee's  port Styx launchers.
Ben getting some photos of the Styx missile in launcher 4 aboard the Hiddensee.
Rear view of the Styx missile in the port launcher aboard the Hiddensee.
Closer views of the 5 inch turrets on the starboard side of the USS Massachusetts.
Second forward turret with 16 inch main guns behind the 5 inch gun turrets.
Triple 16 inch main guns in the single rear turret on the USS Massachusetts.
Mark 12 radar with smaller Mark 22 height finding radar on the rear superstructure of the BB-59
GFCS (Gun Fire Control System) Mk.57 used to direct the 40mm anti-aircraft guns.
Searchlight on the rear superstructure of the USS Massachusetts.
Mk.13 Main Battery Fire Control Radar mounted on top of Mk.38 Main Battery Director One.
SK-2 with 17ft dish antenna for long range radar detection of aircraft, USS Massachusetts.
Maintop mast has SR air search antenna and much smaller SG surface search radar.
Flag in the fantail of the Joe Kennedy, looking at the stern of the USS Massachusetts.
Flag in the fantail of the Joe Kennedy, looking at the bridge over the Taunton River.
Main superstructure of the USS Massachusetts.
Rear deck of the USS Massachusetts.
Arriving back at Battleship Cove the next morning. Mk 32 torpedo launchers aboard the Joe Kennedy.
Bridge of the Joe Kennedy.
Forward 5 inch turret on the Joe Kennedy
Midship mounted RUR-5 ASROC launcher.
Gangplank to go aboard the Joe Kennedy.
Getting another view of the rear 5 inch turret aboard the Joe Kennedy.
Still a nice photo with the flag on the fantail of the Joe Kennedy and the rear 16 inch guns on BB59
Rear 5 inch turret on Joe Kennedy with the USS Massachusetts in the background.
Ben and I going forward along the starboard side of the main deck of the the Joe Kennedy
Forward 5 inch turret in the Joe Kennedy
Forward 5 inch turret on the Joe Kennedy with the bridge overhead.
I wish I knew what these boxes on the side of the 5 inch turret are for.
Looking past the USS Lionfish to the USS Massachusetts.
Rear view of the MK 32 triple torpedo tube launcher on the Joe Kennedy.
Electronics box details on the MK 32 triple torpedo tube launcher.
Forward ends of the MK 32 triple torpedo tube launcher.
USS Lionfish conning tower and forward Bofors 40 mm cannon.
The Hiddensee's 76 mm AK-176 gun turret with the USS Massachusetts' 16 inch forward turrets behind.
MK46 ASW torpedo propellers.
MK46 ASW torpedo seeker and warhead end.
A pair of MK46 ASW torpedoes aboard the Joe Kennedy.
Amidships mounted ASROC launcher on the Joe Kennedy. Bridge dominates background.
The ASROC could be nuclear tipped, so a photo with Ben is required for the series.
Bridge of the USS Joseph P Kennedy. Much more spacious than the bridge on the Hiddensee.
Another view of the bridge.
Plotting table in the Joe Kennedy's CIC.
Plenty of radar scopes. USS Joseph P. Kennedy.
View from above of the plotting table.
I believe this is the radio room aboard the USS Joseph P. Kennedy.
Cases of maps, I think.
An electrical control room aboard the USS Joseph P. Kennedy
Ship's laundry.  Need detergent by the drum-full.
Ship's office, with period telephone and IBM Selectric typewriter.
Other older typewriters in the ship's office.
I guess this is the spot!  Lots of dogs to secure this hatch.
Radiation survey meters, important at the height of the Cold War.
Pretty wide range of goods available at the ship's store.
Back outside on the port side of the main deck.
Up to the helipad on the Joe Kennedy.
View aft from the helipad on the Joe Kennedy
We go back inside to try to get access to the helicopter hangar. We find the crew's racks.
Into the engineering spaces aboard the Joe Kennedy. This looks like a steam-driven generator.
One of the 4 boilers aboard the USS Joseph P. Kennedy.
Boiler number 3 on the Joe Kennedy.
Ben getting some wide angle photos of the boiler.
Large valve of some sort in the boiler room aboard the Joe Kennedy.
Very complicated mechanism hooked up to the steam line.
Side view of one of the boilers aboard the Joe Kennedy.
Ben going up a ladder out of the boiler room.
Back on the main deck of the Joe Kennedy, looking up at the forward smokestack and mainmast.
We figure out how to get into the hangar, where two DASH unmanned helicopters are stored.
Details on a hatch near the hangar and ASROC launcher.
Heading over to the USS Massachusetts, a ramp taking us up to the fantail.
Ben gets his wide angle establishing shot.
Crane on the fantail of the USS Massachusetts for the Kingfisher float plane.
Ben bracing against the cold wind on the fantail of the USS Massachusetts.
Rear 16 inch guns on the USS Massachusetts.
Large collection of radar antennae on the USS Massachusetts' main mast.
Getting closer to the rear 16 inch turret
Two of the rear 16 inch guns are trained on the bridge.
A view of the breech of the starboard 16 inch gun in the rear turret.  Ramp for loading is raised.
Gun Fire Control System (GFCS) Mk.57 above the 40mm anti-aircraft batteries.
Inside the 5 inch turret, looking at a periscope that could be used for aiming.
Relatively spacious inside the 5 inch turret. Must have gotten really hot and noisy.
Passing the main superstructure on the starboard side.
View of some of the 5 inch batteries on the starboard side of BB-59.
Forward pair of twin 40mm anti-aircraft guns.
Ben and I waling forwards to Turret 2 with its 16 inch guns.
On the deck just above the tops of the main gun turrets.
Inside the armored citadel where ship operations could be run from under enemy fire.
Back down ot the main deck, moving forward to Turret 1.
Under the 16 inch guns of Turret 1 looking forward.
On the foredeck of BB-59, looking back at her two forward 16 inch gun turrets.
On the foredeck of BB-59, with her twin 16 inch gun turrets seen to good advantage.
Inside the USS Massachusetts, a large electrical switch installation
Another room with smaller switches, possibly for communications.
Giant steam turbines run off high pressure steam.
Complicated plumbing in the engine room.
Giant reduction gears between the steam turbine and the propellor shaft.
Multiple inspection ports for the big reduction gears.
Complex yet colorful plumbing.
A multi-turn valve.
Giant wheels for the valves controlling water flow into the condensors to recover the steam.
Attractive hose couplers.
Very complicated switch panel.
Ben looking a bit tired at the 5 inch ammunition handling station.
These are elevators that deliver the 5 inch shells.

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