2016Apr Iceland Day 14 PM: Skógafoss & Skogar Folk...
Willis Chung's Gallery
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  1. Willis Chung's Gallery
  2. 2016Apr Iceland Coast
  3. 2016Apr Iceland Day 14 PM: Skógafoss & Skogar Folk Museum2016Apr Iceland Day 14 PM: Skógafoss & Skogar Folk Museum
Skógafoss, on the ring road to the west of Vik.
We weren't planning on stopping at Skógafoss, believing we had seen enough of southern Iceland.
Little waterfall to the west of Skógafoss.
We didn't think the Skogar Folk Museum was open, but we were in luck! We were the only ones there!
Workshops from different periods of time in Iceland's history grafted into the museum.
Love these old machines from the post office.
That's a bit of a shock to the eye!
Wonder if there's any mail for us?
Visitors are able to approach things quite closely here.
The keys are a bit different compared to ours at home.
The characters over the numbers are subtly different, with Pounds instead of Dollars.
Numbers themselves, happily are unchanged.
I am not sure why the "0" is placed centrally, rather than where the "1" is.
More standard number placement on this machine.
Red is clearly the official Postal Service color.
Excellent old style phone system. A switching system anybody can grasp, unlike modern ones.
One of the few phone dials I have seen in a long time.
The urge to put a finger in a hole dial is too strong to resist!
Excellent Citroën snowcar/halftrack. This looks like it would be a hoot to drive!
The back door reminds me of airport shuttle vans. This would be more fun, though.
This also looks like it would be fun to ride in. Looks like it is amphibious as well.
OK, after a giant modern museum, there are a few little outbuildings...
Well, maybe more than a few... Working hard to make turf buildings look interesting.
Turf buildings closed off to the north, with doors and windows facing the sun towards the south.
This is somebody's house! What a great place, amongst the carefully cultivated trees.
Little church...
Northern sod houses. They don't look like sod houses from this angle. I like the corrugated metal!
Interesting door lock, with modern and old hardware.
Really pretty inside. Looks comfortable. This is the 28mm wide angle...
And this is the 10.5mm superwide, with DX crop. I am now in real estate photographer mode.
180 degrees from top to bottom. A cozy room!
Stooping to change perspective to a child's view of the room.
Turns out there are many little houses as part of this museum!
The kitchen, with just the natural light from the single window. Nice and neat!
Upstairs bedroom. The notes ask us to not sit or lay on the beds.
Spinning and weaving tools very well represented in these homes.
Much smaller bedrooms than we have now, unless we are talking college dorms and European hotels.
Next building over is the tack room. Challenging lighting conditions, but OK with the Nikon D800e.
Up in the attic, the first of a large number of butter churns...
Small windows to help keep the warmth in.
Tiny window to the north, looking at the young man-made forest.
Neat and orderly, perfect for a tack room.
A rabbit's view of the turf buildings and church.
I return to the first building's kitchen to take more photos of the old electrical panel.
I like electrical panels... Especially ones with meters of any type!
Door lock looks more 3-dimensional with the distorted perspective of the fisheye lens.
I find the attic above the kitchen, and yes, there is another butter churn.
Back outside again, I go to the ship captain's house next.
The (ship) captain's house is quite grand, made of wood from a shipwreck, if I remember correctly.
Full real estate photographer mode. Roomy sitting room...
Skógafoss, on the ring road to the west of Vik. We weren't planning on stopping at Skógafoss, believing we had seen enough of southern Iceland. Little waterfall to the west of Skógafoss. We didn't think the Skogar Folk Museum was open, but we were in luck!  We were the only ones there! Workshops from different periods of time in Iceland's history grafted into the museum. Love these old machines from the post office. That's a bit of a shock to the eye! Wonder if there's any mail for us? Visitors are able to approach things quite closely here. The keys are a bit different compared to ours at home. The characters over the numbers are subtly different, with Pounds instead of Dollars. Numbers themselves, happily are unchanged. I am not sure why the "0" is placed centrally, rather than where the "1" is. More standard number placement on this machine. Red is clearly the official Postal Service color. Excellent old style phone system.  A switching system anybody can grasp, unlike modern ones. One of the few phone dials I have seen in a long time. The urge to put a finger in a hole dial is too strong to resist! Excellent Citroën snowcar/halftrack.  This looks like it would be a hoot to drive! The back door reminds me of airport shuttle vans.  This would be more fun, though. This also looks like it would be fun to ride in.  Looks like it is amphibious as well. OK, after a giant modern museum, there are a few little outbuildings... Well, maybe more than a few...  Working hard to make turf buildings look interesting. Turf buildings closed off to the north, with doors and windows facing the sun towards the south. This is somebody's house!  What a great place, amongst the carefully cultivated trees. Little church... Northern sod houses.  They don't look like sod houses from this angle.  I like the corrugated metal! Interesting door lock, with modern and old hardware. Really pretty inside.  Looks comfortable.  This is the 28mm wide angle... And this is the 10.5mm superwide, with DX crop.  I am now in real estate photographer mode. 180 degrees from top to bottom.  A cozy room! Stooping to change perspective to a child's view of the room. Turns out there are many little houses as part of this museum! The kitchen, with just the natural light from the single window.  Nice and neat! Upstairs bedroom.  The notes ask us to not sit or lay on the beds. Spinning and weaving tools very well represented in these homes. Much smaller bedrooms than we have now, unless we are talking college dorms and European hotels. Next building over is the tack room.  Challenging lighting conditions, but OK with the Nikon D800e. Up in the attic, the first of a large number of butter churns... Small windows to help keep the warmth in. Tiny window to the north, looking at the young man-made forest. Neat and orderly, perfect for a tack room. A rabbit's view of the turf buildings and church. I return to the first building's kitchen to take more photos of the old electrical panel. I like electrical panels...  Especially  ones with meters of any type! Door lock looks more 3-dimensional with the distorted perspective of the fisheye lens. I find the attic above the kitchen, and yes, there is another butter churn. Back outside again, I go to the ship captain's house next. The (ship) captain's house is quite grand, made of wood from a shipwreck, if I remember correctly. Full real estate photographer mode.  Roomy sitting room...
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